The Enchanted Tarot Review by C.J. Rose ench4s.jpg (21407 bytes)
by Amy Zerner and Monte Farber
pub Saint Martins Press, 1990

If you would like to purchase the Enchanted Tarot book/deck set, click here.

traditional card titles
eight: Strength; eleven: Justice
suits are wands, hearts, swords and pentacles
courts are princess, prince, queen and king
illustrated pips, no captions
backs symmetrical
purpose: Four of Swords

The books premise is, Just as we know that the world does not fade away while we
sleep, the land of our dreams and the incredible power of our Higher Selves lives on
while we are awake. This is the world contacted by people, whom we in the waking
world now call enlightened, but used to call enchanted.

Since antiquity psychics (have) employed the symbolic art appearing on beautiful
Tarot cards to contact the enchanted land. Each of its seventy-eight cards is
designed to embody and convey a special message to both our conscious and
sub-conscious, using only visual symbolism, the official language of both the land
of our dreams and the visual arts.

These are words of the husband of the artist who uses a complex blend of painting
with and on fabric. She utilizes a combination of techniques including collage,
appliqué, direct dye, beading and color image transfers. Rare Victorian trimmings
and antique laces are juxtaposed with space-aged materials and polyester prints.

Each of his texts includes three sections: The Dream describes the card
allegorically. The Awakening brings education to entertainment. The Enchantment
links consciousness with sub-consciousness via healing rituals, charms, chants and
spells for drawing down power, casting out fear, and attracting love, abundance and
health.

This Fool seems to fly. You'll have to look carefully for this Magician's tools.
This High Priestess stands outdoors. This Empress presides from heaven. This
Emperor lacks the feminine orb. This Hierophant stands outdoors. These Lovers
dance. This Chariot is a reindeer ridden by Brunhilde. This Strength has crowned
her lion. This Hermit walks without benefit of staff. This Wheel has nine
divisions. This Justice raises sword outdoors. This Hanged Man swings. This Death
smiles. This Temperance teaches. This Devil is an oriental mask. This Tower
explodes from within. This Star attracts water up to her. This Moon appears warm
and friendly. This Sun beams on a pair of robins. This Judgment attracts a
professional suit. This World is out of this world.

The pips of Wands are Initiation, Planning, Opportunity, Completion, Competition,
Victory, Courage, Signals, Discipline and Oppression. The pips of Hearts are Love,
Romance, Celebration, Re-evaluation, Disappointment, Joy, Illusion, Sacrifice,
Fulfillment and Success. The pips of Swords are Force, Balance, Sorrow, Seclusion,
Defeat, Passage, Opposition, Indecision, Nightmare and Ruin. The pips of Pentacles
are Reward, Change, Work, Possessiveness, Anxiety, Generosity, Frustration,
Craftsmanship, Abundance and Protection.

The Dream of the Four of Swords asks to have a word with us, In a place of seclusion
and stability, a calm, centered Buddha sits in a position of meditation. He has
retreated from strife and is relieved of all anxiety. The pyramid shape around his
body creates a healing space. Clouds representing the confusion and pressure of the
everyday world are parting, and all that remains is the purity of the connection to
the eternal earth and the infinite stars.

If you would like to purchase the Enchanted Tarot book/deck set, click here.

See more images from the Enchanted Tarot

Review Copyright (c) 1998 C.J. Rose

Images Copyright (c) Amy Zerner



This page is Copyright © 1998 by Michele Jackson