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The Tarot of Ceremonial Magick  Review by C.J. Rose
by Lon Milo and Constance Duquette

If you would like to purchase this book/deck set, click here.

If you would like to purchase this deck, click here.

If you would like to purchase the companion book for this deck only, click here.

pub U.S. Games Systems, 1994
traditional card titles, Key 10 as Fortune, Key 14 as Art, Key 20 as Aeon the way
Crowley does in the Book of Thoth
eight: Justice; eleven: Lust
suits are wands, cups, swords and disks
courts are princess, prince, queen and knight
no illustrated pips, captions
backs non-symmetrical
purpose: Ten of Disks

This deck incorporates the key elements of Enochian magic, Goetia, Astrology, Tattwa
meditation symbols and I Ching hexagrams.  Its scope includes use by beginners and
adepts.  In addition to relating our familiar Twenty-two to elemental, planetary and
zodiacal information, it also displays the magical seals of the Geniis (Spirits) of
the Domarcum Mercurii (House of Mercury) and the Carcerorum Qlipoth (Prison of the
Shells), according to Crowley’s enigmatic Libers.  The LWB invites us to invoke these
guides, counselors and agents of the forces and dimensions represented by the trumps.

The suits are related to the four Qabalistic worlds.  Atziluth, the archetypal sphere
to wands; Briah, the creative realm to cups; Yetzirah, the world of formation to
swords; and Assiah, the material level to disks.

Perceived as the roots and seeds of their suits, aces in this deck invoke the
Enochian Elemental Tablets.  Each contains 156 (12x13) squares upon which are
inscribed letters of the names of the angelic beings the magus may wish to visit.
The court cards relate to the quarters of each tablet.  Each of these sixteen
“subangles” is noted, as well as the appropriate square in the Tablet of Union, which
includes the aces.  The Tattwa symbols, used by the Golden Dawn for astral projection
into elemental realms, also find mention in these twenty cards.  Even the I Ching
helps define the court cards, by taking half the eight trigrams, those aligned with
the four elements, and combining them to form sixteen hexagrams.

The titles and meanings of the pip cards, twos through tens, are attributed to decans
in the zodiac, including exact degrees and days of the year, planetary assignations,
and positions on the Tree of Life.  Let us not leave out the 72 angels of the
Shemhamphorash!  Or the 72 Spirits of the Goetia, drawn from Crowleys’ 777 which drew
them from the first book of Lemegeton!  These “fallen angels” of the middle ages are
here introduced to modern magicians, as aspects of Self ready for control and
direction.

This Pictorial Synthesis of the Three Great pillars of Magick has this to say of its
value: Ten of Disks.  “If properly applied, true wisdom and perfect happiness.”

If you would like to purchase this book/deck set, click here.

If you would like to purchase this deck, click here.

If you would like to purchase the companion book for this deck only, click here.

See more cards from the Tarot of Ceremonial Magick

 

Copyright (c) 1998 C.J. Rose

Images Copyright (c) 1994 US Games Systems, 179 Ludlow St., Stamford CT, 06902 (800)544-2637



This page is Copyright 1998 by Michele Jackson