Daughters of the Moon Tarot Deck
Review by Michele Jackson

If you would like to purchase this deck, click here.

If you would like to purchase the companion book, click here.

This deck is one of the most beautiful in my not inconsiderable collection. The cards are round and rather large (5 1/4" diameter). The images in this deck were drawn by several different women over a period of years, yet it does not have the disjointed look many collaborative efforts seem to have. The art is good and the colors are intense and vivid. Each card has a border colored in one of several hues of purple, aqua, black, brick red, or pink. This is a "theme" deck, and the theme is feminism. There are only two males depicted in this deck and they are both optional. The deck is multicultural, depicting women of all races, sizes and abilities. There is some nudity, and the scenes can be rather "earthy." This deck closely aaproaches, if not falls into, the category of "not quite Tarot." Rather than divide the deck into a Major and Minor Arcana, the creators of this deck chose to divide the cards into five suits, with the additional suit "Aether" representing the cards traditionally found in the Major Arcana. Other changes to the Majors have resulted in this suit having 21 cards vice 22. The cards of this suit and their traditional Major Arcana equivalents when applicable are:

The cards in the suit of Aether are not numbered. The court cards have also been changed with the traditional King, Queen, Knight and Page replaced by Maiden, Mother and Crone. These three energies are also represented in the suit of Aether by The Amazon (Maiden), Mawu (Mother) and The Wise One (Crone). The twelve court cards are each assigned a sign of the zodiac, and a Goddess or mythological woman. The card name and zodiac sign are in the border at the top, and the name of the Goddess or mythological woman is in the border at the bottom. The suits are Flames (Wands), Cups, Blades (Swords) and Pentacles. The numbered cards have the name on top and a short interpretation or the name of the figure on the bottom. Some of the numbered cards also depict Goddesses or women from myth. The interpretations are non-traditional for the most part.

This deck does not seem to come with a little booklet. I have three copies of this deck and could not find a booklet in any of them. My color versions did come with an extra copy of the Reversal card, with a leaflet explaining that the original printed version had a flaw. This commitment to quality is laudable. The color version reviewed here is the second iteration of this deck. The original version was black and white and came with brief instructions on how to color it for yourself. There is a book written specifically for this deck called Daughters of the Moon by Ffiona Morgan. I recommend that you purchase the book if you plan to work with this deck as it provides some background information on the philosophy of the deck, and interpretations of the cards. The book also has poetry and information on the Goddesses and myths used in the deck.

Obviously the lack of male figures will make this deck not to everyone's liking. I would recommend this deck for those who want a deck with little or no male energy. It would be suitable for use in Dianic work, or for women's spirituality work.

If you would like to purchase this deck, click here.

If you would like to purchase the companion book, click here.

Daughters of the Moon Tarot by Ffiona Morgan
ISBN: 1-880130-04-1
 
Daughters of the Moon Book
ISBN: 1-880130-01-7


This page is Copyright 1997 by Michele Jackson