Medicine Woman Tarotmw.jpg (16588 bytes)                                                                            Review by Michele Jackson
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The Medicine Woman Tarot falls dangerously close if not into the category "Not Quite Tarot". The Major Arcana have been reinterpreted to incorporate Native American spiritual ideas. The Court cards have been re-invented as well and are Apprentice, Totem, Harvest Lodge and Exemplar. The suits are Stones, Pipes, Arrows and Bowls. The art is simple line drawings of a fair quality colored primarily in pastels and warm colors. The deck looks as if it were done in ink and watercolor. The colors and style make the deck look warm and comfortable. There are scenes on all the cards and while the deck is based on Native American Spirituality, the art is multi-cultural. The mix of Native American ideas with the traditional Tarot is done as well as can be expected, but in order to combine these systems, both had to be bent quite a bit. The Native American information is not from any one tribe, but is a combination of ideas from many different traditions. Tarot enthusiasts may find the interpretations too different, and students of Native American culture may find the hodge-podge of cultural ideas dismaying.
There is a book written for this deck: The Medicine Woman Inner Guidebook. It does an excellent job explaining the ideology behind the deck. Although it drags up the dreaded "Gypsy Theory", I can overlook that because of its positive slant, affirmations and many exercises, including meditations and visualizations. It reminds one of those daily meditations books, only better. Very positive in outlook, this book is a gem.
 
See more images from the Medicine Woman Tarot Deck
 
If you would like to purchase this deck, click here.
 
Medicine Woman Tarot Deck
ISBN: 0-88079-419-4
Publisher US Games Systems, 179 Ludlow St., Stamford, CT 06902, (800)544-2637, Fax (203)353-8431
 
Images Copyright (c) 1989 Carol Bridges


This page is Copyright 1997 by Michele Jackson