The Unicorn Tarot                                                                           Review by Michele Jackson

If you would like to purchase this deck, click here.

          If you would like to purchase this deck/book set, click here.

This deck is basically a Waite-Smith clone stripped of its meaningful symbolism. In place of symbolism, we are given unicorns. The art is fair. The colors are good and the artist used color to distinguish the suits. Swords have a lavender background, Rods an orange background, cups are blue and pentacles are earth tones. Every card has a unicorn incorporated into the scene. Even Death has a unicorn skeleton. The Major Arcana are the same as the Waite deck with Strength as 8 and Justice as 11. The Court cards are also the same as Waite: King, Queen, Knight and Page. The suits are Swords, Rods, Cups and Pentacles. In the little booklet that comes with the deck Swords are assigned to Air and Rods to Fire.

The scenes on this deck are basically stripped down renderings of Pamela Colman-Smith's work. For example, The Fool is shown stepping off a cliff clutching a Unicorn horn in his hand, with a small unicorn rearing on his hind legs behind him. No bag, no flower, no Sun in the background. The Magician looks like an old Wizard with the symbols for the suits allegedly being juggled (looks more like they are falling to me), in front of him. The ubiquitous unicorn is to his right.The High Priestess is a buxom blond in a clingy white gown, holding a "magic glowing rod". There is no scroll, no pillars, no Moon, no fruit, no nothing other than the woman, the unicorn and three spherical towers in the background. The Minors are also stripped down versions of the Waite deck for the most part. On some cards, the artist re-interpreted the scenes, however, it seems no one told the author of the little booklet. The Five of Pentacles, for example shows a female artist painting, guess what? - a unicorn, yet the interpretation given is "Financial struggle or frustration. Possible psychosomatic or genuine illness." Maybe it's me, but I don't see a connection between the scene on the card and the interpretation given. One wonders how much the artist knew about Tarot before drawing this deck, and whether the author of the booklet had actually seen the deck she was writing about.

The little booklet that comes with the deck works hard to justify the inclusion of the unicorn in each card. Per the author, the unicorn is spiritual, wise, strong, and has magical powers. I guess she thought that was reason enough to put one on every card. The booklet provides both upright and reversed interpretations, and the Celtic Cross spread. The card backs show two unicorns in a golden circle on a light purple background in a narrow gold colored frame. I would recommend this deck as a novelty item for those who collect or are enamored of unicorns.

See the Unicorn Tarot Deck

 If you would like to purchase this deck, click here.

          If you would like to purchase this deck/book set, click here.
 
The Unicorn Tarot
Publisher: US Games Systems. 179 Ludlow St., Stamford CT 06902, (800)544-2673.


This page is Copyright 1997 by Michele Jackson